Feeling Stuck? Try Some Emotional Therapy Using N.E.T.

Guest Post By Michelle S. Lim, D.C.

“Our emotional reality affects the physiology of our body.”

Whether we are conscious of it or not, we all have conditioned reflexes that we’ve acquired in life. Much of these reflexes are necessary for survival and ensure the safety and well being of others. We hit the brakes when we see an animal on the road, we lift our hands up to protect us when we sense something is falling from above, and we pull our hands away when we feel a hot dish. These are all normal reactions that contribute to our well-being, but what happens when we have deep seated emotional responses that no longer serve us?

A classic example would be a soldier who has returned home from war. Although he is safe and sound in his downtown San Diego neighborhood, the sound of a helicopter flying overhead might trigger his limbic system, dragging along old memories, making him think he was in combat again. He might drop down on the floor and instinctively look for a gun that is not there. His pulse will beat hard, his breaths even faster, while his blood pressure goes through the roof, anticipating the worst. Obviously, this is a dramatic example of what we know as PTSD, or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

You see, in the emotional brain (the limbic system), time doesn’t exist. Due to the fact that emotions don’t have a linear sense of time, but rather, can effortlessly weave in and out of the past, we may be carrying around emotions that unknowingly dictate our lives. Much like the veteran who’s safe and sound in his home town but still gets a sympathetic flight or fight response every time he hears a loud noise, we may be soldiers of our past, carrying around fears, burdens, anger, resentment, sadness or paralyzed will, unwillingly creating a mental block or emotional prison.

When the emotional aspect of the brain takes over, superceding all rational and logical thought processes, this is called neurological hijacking. The limbic system takes control and as intelligent as we may be, we become immune to our responses because this is how we’ve always known it to be.

From the very first moment we encountered a not so favored situation, we’ve developed a way to cope with the problem and continue to use that emotional response time after time, much like an automated message. We’ve trained ourselves to “feel” a certain way regardless of how different the situation is. If it “feels” like a situation we’ve been in before, we already have a preset reaction to deal with it.

As I mentioned earlier, there are many times when our learned responses serve us well and ensure our survival. But when it no longer serves us, like the veteran who’s returned home, then we need to retrain our neo-cortex to think differently and be “ok” with whatever’s happening.

Research has already proven that stress causes negative physiologic reaction to the body and science has shown that people under stress are more susceptible to getting ill and are slower to recover compared to those who aren’t under any perceived stress. Whether real or perceived, stress directly affects the nervous system, which has a great impact on the immune system.

We are capable of measuring the physiologic effects of stress through monitoring heart rate, monitoring the respiratory system, assessing pulse rate, a Galvanic skin response, a polygraph test and muscle testing.

WHAT IS N.E.T.?

N.E.T. stands for Neuro Emotional Technique used by many health practitioners, Chiropractors, Naturopaths, M.D.s, Psychologists and MFTPs alike, who are in favor of holistic and conservative techniques.

Through muscle testing, N.E.T. is a mind-body technique that uses a methodology of finding and removing neurological imbalances related to the physiology of unresolved stress. N.E.T. is a tool that can help improve many behavioral and physical conditions.

WHAT CAN N.E.T. TREAT?

N.E.T. Practitioners are nearly unlimited in their ability to address the physical and behavioral stress-related conditions of their patients. These conditions include headaches, body pains, phobias, general anxiety, self-sabotaging behaviors, organ dysfunctions and so much more. It’s important to note that N.E.T. does not cure or heal the patient, but rather, N.E.T. removes blocks to the natural vitalism of the body, “allowing” the body to repair itself naturally.

N.E.T. has more than a 60% success rate in treating PTSD and is currently approved by the government as a conservative and cost-effective treatment for soldiers returning home.

To learn more, visit NETmindbody.com.

Dr. Lim utilizes the NET technique in her practice. Call (562) 920-6644 for consultation.

– Dr. Michelle S. Lim, D.C.

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